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Islanding the power grid on the transmission level: less connections for more security

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
Title
Islanding the power grid on the transmission level: less connections for more security
Published in
Scientific Reports, October 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep34797
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mario Mureddu, Guido Caldarelli, Alfonso Damiano, Antonio Scala, Hildegard Meyer-Ortmanns

Abstract

Islanding is known as a management procedure of the power system that is implemented at the distribution level to preserve sensible loads from outages and to guarantee the continuity in electricity supply, when a high amount of distributed generation occurs. In this paper we study islanding on the level of the transmission grid and shall show that it is a suitable measure to enhance energy security and grid resilience. We consider the German and Italian transmission grids. We remove links either randomly to mimic random failure events, or according to a topological characteristic, their so-called betweenness centrality, to mimic an intentional attack and test whether the resulting fragments are self-sustainable. We test this option via the tool of optimized DC power flow equations. When transmission lines are removed according to their betweenness centrality, the resulting islands have a higher chance of being dynamically self-sustainable than for a random removal. Less connections may even increase the grid's stability. These facts should be taken into account in the design of future power grids.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 2 6%
Germany 1 3%
Russia 1 3%
Unknown 32 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 31%
Researcher 5 14%
Professor 5 14%
Student > Master 5 14%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 13 36%
Unspecified 8 22%
Physics and Astronomy 6 17%
Computer Science 2 6%
Mathematics 2 6%
Other 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2017.
All research outputs
#739,178
of 12,430,263 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#6,923
of 56,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,193
of 264,310 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#475
of 3,311 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,430,263 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 56,584 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,310 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,311 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.