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Debunking in a world of tribes

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
14 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
192 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
115 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Debunking in a world of tribes
Published in
PLoS ONE, July 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0181821
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fabiana Zollo, Alessandro Bessi, Michela Del Vicario, Antonio Scala, Guido Caldarelli, Louis Shekhtman, Shlomo Havlin, Walter Quattrociocchi, Zollo, Fabiana, Bessi, Alessandro, Del Vicario, Michela, Scala, Antonio, Caldarelli, Guido, Shekhtman, Louis, Havlin, Shlomo, Quattrociocchi, Walter

Abstract

Social media aggregate people around common interests eliciting collective framing of narratives and worldviews. However, in such a disintermediated environment misinformation is pervasive and attempts to debunk are often undertaken to contrast this trend. In this work, we examine the effectiveness of debunking on Facebook through a quantitative analysis of 54 million users over a time span of five years (Jan 2010, Dec 2014). In particular, we compare how users usually consuming proven (scientific) and unsubstantiated (conspiracy-like) information on Facebook US interact with specific debunking posts. Our findings confirm the existence of echo chambers where users interact primarily with either conspiracy-like or scientific pages. However, both groups interact similarly with the information within their echo chamber. Then, we measure how users from both echo chambers interacted with 50,220 debunking posts accounting for both users consumption patterns and the sentiment expressed in their comments. Sentiment analysis reveals a dominant negativity in the comments to debunking posts. Furthermore, such posts remain mainly confined to the scientific echo chamber. Only few conspiracy users engage with corrections and their liking and commenting rates on conspiracy posts increases after the interaction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 192 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 3%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Italy 2 2%
Unknown 108 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 22%
Researcher 22 19%
Student > Master 21 18%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Other 8 7%
Other 28 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 25 22%
Computer Science 16 14%
Unspecified 15 13%
Psychology 13 11%
Physics and Astronomy 8 7%
Other 38 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 259. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2018.
All research outputs
#35,441
of 11,477,494 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#825
of 127,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,214
of 262,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#26
of 3,219 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,477,494 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 127,419 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,219 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.