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Green Power Grids: How Energy from Renewable Sources Affects Networks and Markets

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Green Power Grids: How Energy from Renewable Sources Affects Networks and Markets
Published in
PLoS ONE, January 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0135312
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mario Mureddu, Guido Caldarelli, Alessandro Chessa, Antonio Scala, Alfonso Damiano

Abstract

The increasing attention to environmental issues is forcing the implementation of novel energy models based on renewable sources. This is fundamentally changing the configuration of energy management and is introducing new problems that are only partly understood. In particular, renewable energies introduce fluctuations which cause an increased request for conventional energy sources to balance energy requests at short notice. In order to develop an effective usage of low-carbon sources, such fluctuations must be understood and tamed. In this paper we present a microscopic model for the description and for the forecast of short time fluctuations related to renewable sources in order to estimate their effects on the electricity market. To account for the inter-dependencies in the energy market and the physical power dispatch network, we use a statistical mechanics approach to sample stochastic perturbations in the power system and an agent based approach for the prediction of the market players' behavior. Our model is data-driven; it builds on one-day-ahead real market transactions in order to train agents' behaviour and allows us to deduce the market share of different energy sources. We benchmarked our approach on the Italian market, finding a good accordance with real data.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 2 6%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Italy 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Colombia 1 3%
Unknown 28 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 32%
Student > Master 7 21%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Professor 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 11 32%
Physics and Astronomy 5 15%
Unspecified 4 12%
Computer Science 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 9 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2015.
All research outputs
#1,096,901
of 11,346,525 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#20,232
of 126,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,418
of 237,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#850
of 5,767 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,346,525 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 126,124 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,800 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,767 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.